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Most Cost Effective Nutrient Solution Method (In Your Opinion)?


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  #1  
Old 10-05-2011, 09:09 AM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Default Most Cost Effective Nutrient Solution Method (In Your Opinion)?

Guys, what in your opinion is the most cost effective nutrient solution on the market, preferably dry?

I would prefer one that works across the board on tomatoes, squash, strawberries, bell peppers etc. I am not looking for a solution for every single type of plant, and having to get many versions for different plant stages.

Simply looking for a good all around, cost effective brand/type that will last a long time in bulk. This is for a greenhouse based hydroponics setup, so light is not going to be even remotely an issue on our property.

Thanks you guys, could really use some pointers.

GPS as always feel free to twist my head in the right direction

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  #2  
Old 10-05-2011, 09:11 AM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Floramato Dry?
GENERAL HYDROPONICS
This dry blend of minerals was specially designed to enhance the luscious flavors of tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, eggplants, beans, melons, strawberries, and other continuously fruiting or flowering plants. FloraMato Dry is a stand-alone, fully water-soluble, dry nutrient. This unique combination of Primary and Secondary nutrients with pH buffers keeps nutrients fully water-soluble and available to plants.

Maxi Series?
GENERAL HYDROPONICS
axiGro tm and MaxiBloom tm are extremely potent, stand-alone, water-soluble, dry concentrate nutrients. Complete in Primary, Secondary, and Micro Nutrients, pH buffered MaxiGro and MaxiBloom will provide superior results when used with a wide variety of crops in both hydroponic and soil-based environments.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:21 PM
frnz571 frnz571 is offline
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the best [cheapest] way is to make it up yourself and is just as good as as any of the overpriced brand names.That may overwhelm some so i my self buy a two part fertilizer from a hydroponic greenhouse supply.

check
Fertilizers
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:26 PM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Ok, need to get just a little more information than that. If you can clarify, that would be awesome. Yes, I am a hydro newbie, and yes I learn very very fast.

Do I have to make all these different styles, or can i come up with a universal mix ratio that covers many different types of vegetables.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:46 PM
frnz571 frnz571 is offline
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the web site i posted has a hobby formula.
if you want to make up your own batch you would have to do research .
this book got might be of help at the library
Hydroponic food production :howard m resh
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Old 10-05-2011, 04:07 PM
frnz571 frnz571 is offline
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you can go with one style of fertilizer and make changes as you learn. some plants have different needs so you need to research the type of plants you want to grow and make improvements as you go. I would jump right in, at least thats what i would do

Last edited by frnz571; 10-05-2011 at 10:07 PM.
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  #7  
Old 10-05-2011, 04:19 PM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Understood. I know I want to start with tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumber, romaine lettuce, and any other ideas that people may have. The type or variant of each of those I am open to as long as they can grow off the same nutrient solution source. Right now I am at that point of identifying what vegetables can grow together (and we have a lot of stations ready to go), and what universal type of solution would work the best with the largest collection of vegetables.

I am not ready to start making different solutions going to different sections of hydroponics.

So believe me, I am all ears for suggestions.
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  #8  
Old 10-06-2011, 07:07 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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I agree that making your own nutrients is generally the most cost effective, assuming you use a lot, or need a different formula for different plants. But that just isn't really for the beginner. Even most intermediate growers I know of don't make there own. If you don't already, you'll need a good comprehension of chemistry. It's not quite like just mixing a certain number of ingredient to bake a cake. You need a understanding of what all the elements (ingredients) do, precise measuring equipment, know what the difference between similar elements are (thus why chemistry knowledge), including the different types of Chelated Micro-nutrients. That's all before knowing how to tell if the recipe is even working correctly, and if there is any nutrient deficiency or toxicities, or if the symptoms are from other environmental conditions like light, humidly, temp (both air and water/root zone), co2, pests/insects etc.. Diagnosing problems becomes multiplied ten fold+ when you throw in the manufacturing of your own nutrients (thus makes the beginner learning curve much harder). I don't have time right now, but I can post some links to info about it if you want. I would post it right now, but I really don't have time. I'll try to remember when I do though anyway (but you may need to remind me).

P.S. Also when making your own, you'll need to buy each element separately, as well as stockpile them so you have what you need on hand when you need it. That could be costly for a beginner just trying out hydroponics. Then if they don't work well, you may be discouraged from continuing in hydroponics (especially after so much effort and expense).

As for a good cost effective general purpose nutrient, I have used these with good results:
The Verti-Gro Hydroponic Fertilizers and Nutrients - Organic and Hydroponic Growing for Commercial and Hobby Growers

Specifically, 5-10-25 & 15-0-0
SKU#: F15002
SKU#: F510252

Also sold in the combo SKU#: FCombo

But here are a few other company's nutrients I plan to try out

QuickGrow Nutrient Fertilizer
Buy Hydroponics - J. R. Peters Inc. Fertilizer Products And Services

P.S.
The nutrients sold by the company frnz571 mentioned are also on my list of nutrients to try. However I would call them before ordering. Simply because the info on their website isn't the easiest to find/navigate, or clear. I have dealt with them before and even though there shipping policy is strange (compared to others), they seemed to have very good customer service. In fact, the book I ordered (Fresh Culinary Herb Production) from them arrived in only 3 days (shipping for it was about $3).

Just my two cents...
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  #9  
Old 10-06-2011, 01:28 PM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Makes me wonder who has the best deal, for an entry level buyer (that wants to buy some dry nutrients) to put some away in storage:

J. R. Peters Inc. Fertilizer Products And Services
Buy Hydroponics - J. R. Peters Inc. Fertilizer Products And Services

or

Hydro Gardens
Fertilizers

Both have a different blend composite (main + calcium nitrate), but I am looking for one to start with that is optimum for a one solution for a wide array of veggies. I hate wasting money, so I do not plan on buying a little of them all, but rather one type to grow 7 to 12 different vegetables and learn as I go.
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:27 PM
Stan Stan is offline
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I took some screen shots from another site (not sure if I could post the link here). Check out the PH and PPM levels to see what you could possibly grow using the same reservoir.
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Old 10-06-2011, 10:51 PM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Thanks Stan, this is similar to GPS / Home Hydro. Nice to see as much information as possible.
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Old 10-07-2011, 05:10 PM
T'Mater T'Mater is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrossOps View Post
Floramato Dry?
GENERAL HYDROPONICS
This dry blend of minerals was specially designed to enhance the luscious flavors of tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, eggplants, beans, melons, strawberries, and other continuously fruiting or flowering plants. FloraMato Dry is a stand-alone, fully water-soluble, dry nutrient. This unique combination of Primary and Secondary Nutrients with pH buffers keeps nutrients fully water-soluble and available to plants.

Maxi Series?
GENERAL HYDROPONICS
axiGro tm and MaxiBloom tm are extremely potent, stand-alone, water-soluble, dry concentrate nutrients. Complete in Primary, Secondary, and Micro Nutrients, pH buffered MaxiGro and MaxiBloom will provide superior results when used with a wide variety of crops in both hydroponic and soil-based environments.

The Floramato is no longer produced, you can find it still on the market but once it's gone it's gone. Stinks, i really enjoyed using it.
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Old 10-07-2011, 05:23 PM
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Yeah, I just found out the Maxi Series is what they are running with now.
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Old 11-09-2011, 08:23 PM
travis_lex travis_lex is offline
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Default Hydro nutrients sticker shock? - I chose the GH nutes, here's why . . .

Hydro nutrients sticker shock???

It is true, when first going through various catalogs and websites, some of these specialty hydroponics nutrients can appear to be more than a bit pricey.

But then again, there's more to this than first meets the eye.

Hydro nutrients are (or should be) a bit different than ordinary generic plant foods, because the plants absorb these nutrients almost instantaneously, somewhat like intravenous feeding for plants. The impact on the plants (bad or good) is almost immediate, and can have profound effect on the plant's health.

Therefore, hydro nutrients should be as pure and precisely formulated as possible. I've seen this myself, as in hydro setups using actual nutrients designed for that application, and other setups using some sort of homebrew mix of ordinary "brand x" plant food. The results are noticeable, and if something goes a bit wrong, the results are, well . . . not so good.

So, I put a lot of emphasis in the nutrients, as being the most important link in the hydroponics chain.

Given that criteria, the General Hydroponics Maxi series is actually fairly cost effective, as these are highly concentrated powdered formulas, that do work surprisingly well . . . if you follow the instructions!

Don't overfeed - just use exactly what the instructions call for.

I also use some of the Floralicious series nute enhancers in some situations. GH actually produces quite a range of nutrients, micro and enhancement nutes, rooting formulas, and so on. I like this particular company because they have been doing this for over 30 years, and are constantly researching new developments.

That's just my personal choice, but whatever nutrients you decide to use, I would suggest taking a closer look at some of the high performance nutrient systems specifically developed for hydroponics . . . it's what's actually in the formula, and how its used that counts, not what the larger looking bottle of "brand x" plant food costs in the local hardware store, that really counts.
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Old 11-09-2011, 08:57 PM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Nutrients purchased, and discussion in main thread.

http://www.hydroponicsonline.com/for....html#post8518
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Old 11-09-2011, 08:58 PM
CrossOps CrossOps is offline
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Travis, thanks for the reply, and adding to the conversation. Welcome to the site bro, good to have you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by travis_lex View Post
Hydro nutrients sticker shock???

It is true, when first going through various catalogs and websites, some of these specialty hydroponics nutrients can appear to be more than a bit pricey.

But then again, there's more to this than first meets the eye.

Hydro nutrients are (or should be) a bit different than ordinary generic plant foods, because the plants absorb these nutrients almost instantaneously, somewhat like intravenous feeding for plants. The impact on the plants (bad or good) is almost immediate, and can have profound effect on the plant's health.

Therefore, hydro nutrients should be as pure and precisely formulated as possible. I've seen this myself, as in hydro setups using actual nutrients designed for that application, and other setups using some sort of homebrew mix of ordinary "brand x" plant food. The results are noticeable, and if something goes a bit wrong, the results are, well . . . not so good.

So, I put a lot of emphasis in the nutrients, as being the most important link in the hydroponics chain.

Given that criteria, the General Hydroponics Maxi series is actually fairly cost effective, as these are highly concentrated powdered formulas, that do work surprisingly well . . . if you follow the instructions!

Don't overfeed - just use exactly what the instructions call for.

I also use some of the Floralicious series nute enhancers in some situations. GH actually produces quite a range of nutrients, micro and enhancement nutes, rooting formulas, and so on. I like this particular company because they have been doing this for over 30 years, and are constantly researching new developments.

That's just my personal choice, but whatever nutrients you decide to use, I would suggest taking a closer look at some of the high performance nutrient systems specifically developed for hydroponics . . . it's what's actually in the formula, and how its used that counts, not what the larger looking bottle of "brand x" plant food costs in the local hardware store, that really counts.
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  #17  
Old 11-09-2011, 09:18 PM
frnz571 frnz571 is offline
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the nutrients that i and also GPSFrontier had mention do not come from a hardware store.they are developed and used by professionals that i know for fact have been in the business since the 70's.
i believe the pros would be using Gh if that was cost effective.

My tomatoes last summer got severe Hail damage so i kind of gave up on them and they just received water only without any nutrients at all for two months. i was surprised how well they did without me hardy paying any attention to them.

the lesson i learned is don't give up on my plants because they are tough survivors. [The Hail hit them really hard]. But also I do not feel that i have to be so obsessed with the nutrients i give them.

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