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My 2nd "Aeroponic" Hybrid Setup


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Old 12-02-2009, 11:35 AM
txice txice is offline
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Default My 2nd "Aeroponic" Hybrid Setup

Thought I'd post a little bit of info on my latest project. This is really an expansion/refinement of my smaller "cloner" system that I've posted about in another forum here. It's still an "aeroponics hybrid" type setup, just on a slightly bigger scale and intended to hold fewer, larger plants.

They key find in this build for me was the tote itself. In my first build I had issues with leaking around lid when the pumps were on and I wanted to find a tote that was a little more resistant to that by design. The tote I ended up with I had actually seen online in a Youtube video. It took a little bit of digging around and some research to figure out what tote it was and where to find it...but I finally did. The nice thing about this particular tote is that the lid (when placed on "right side up") has a upwards hump to it. When flipped over and placed inside the tote upside down, this provides a very nice lip (almost) all the way around the tote that prevents any water from getting up to and over the top lip of the tote. Built in leak protection! The only place I had to worry about leaking was on the very ends where the little curved part of the lid over the handle area doesn't provide this lip. Some weather stripping around the lip of the tote is proving enough to prevent any leaks here though.

As you can see in the picture of the lid, these will be 8 site systems. Probably not enough room for some of the plants at full maturity, but should be large enough for 8 plants to have plenty of grow room for a while. I'm using 3.75" net pots in the system. A 3.5" hole saw and a few minutes on each hole with some sand paper made for a perfect snug, flush fit for the pots.

Next couple of pics show the spray bar configuration. Took a little bit of tweaking to get the sprayers at just the right height, but I ended up with excellent coverage across all 8 pots. The sprayers are the ones used in the EZ-Clone system. The pump is a 400 GPH pump. The pic showing the test fit of the spray assembly inside the tote also highlights one of my two gripes about this tote. You can clearly see the "vents" on the handle area inside the tote. Covering these somehow was obviously a necessity, yet proved somewhat of a challenge at the same time. I ended up using some clear silicon caulk to cover the slits and to fill in the handle recesses. It holds perfectly well so far...will have to see how it holds up in the long run.

The second gripe I have about the totes themselves is that they are rather thin and let light in. As you can see I decided to paint the totes to try and block any light from coming through. Took several coats on each to get a good light block. Also got a close up pic in there showing the hole I drilled for the power plug for the pump and the air hose. The hole for the air hose is a bit smaller than the diameter of the hose itself, so it's a very tight fit and doesn't leak at all. For the power plug hole, I have the cord fitted through a neoprene disc to prevent any water leaks.

The light I added uses a 400W MH/hps switchable ballast. I'm currently using the MH bulb in a very basic (and cheap ) "bat wing" reflector.

I've got some plants in the system now but don't have any pics of that yet. The last one shows both totes in their final resting place with net pots in place. You can also see the dual outlet airpump off to the side in the last pic that supplies the air to the 6" air stones placed in the bottom of each tote.

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Last edited by txice; 12-02-2009 at 11:41 AM.
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Old 12-03-2009, 03:28 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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I really like this setup and your design, and these are good pictures of it all. I also see now how the upside down lid fits. It looks secure enough but if not it would be simple enough to drop some pins in the corners. I only have 2 possible suggestions. One painting it black works great to light proof it, but I would paint it white after to reflect light so it wont absorb heat as much. The second is I don't know if you glued P.V.C. tubing and if not that is fine but if you did it would be imposable to clean it out. I am thinking of the legs. If there was ever a time that some bacteria got into the solution you wouldn't be able to clean out the legs thoroughly. All you would be able to do is soak it in bleach. I would probably just fill them with something like 100% silicone or use a connector that was solid. Other than that I relay like this design.

I plan to build a couple of aeroponic systems and have a few questions about the pump you have. By the look of the box I assume you got it at a hydro store.

1. I am wondering if it gives you a psi rating and/or if it tells how many emitters/misters it was rated for?

2. Does it say it is for aeroponisc? Just wondering if it is designed for more pressure or just more volume that makes the biggest difference.

3. How much it costs?

4. Brand name or website if it has one?

5. I assume you tested it to see if all the emitters/misters were getting enough presser and if they were? Also if you would be abble to add more emitters without much presser loss?

The systems I am planning would be much bigger, but use the same type of P.V.C. tubing with the emitters/misters screwed into it for the delivery system . My issue is getting enough presser to feed all the emitters/misters I need without buying a lot of pumps. I have a plan to use a small inexpensive presser washer with a presser regulator, but will probably be a hassel to work out the bugs.
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Last edited by GpsFrontier; 12-03-2009 at 04:08 AM.
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Old 12-03-2009, 10:52 AM
txice txice is offline
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Thanks .

Quote:
Originally Posted by GpsFrontier View Post
I also see now how the upside down lid fits. It looks secure enough but if not it would be simple enough to drop some pins in the corners.
It is indeed quite secure and there have been no issues with leaking at all. The wife and I thought we might need to get some sort of clip of some kind to pinch down the ends, but just the weather striping and the weight of the lid itself is proving enough to prevent water from coming out. The odd thing about this model of the tote is that the larger size (the 54 gal one) is the only version of this tote where the lid actually fits inside the tote upside down. The smaller sizes of the same design don't work the same way (at least not the ones they had at the store there that I tested).

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Originally Posted by GpsFrontier View Post
One painting it black works great to light proof it, but I would paint it white after to reflect light so it wont absorb heat as much.
You know I wanted to do that, but the wife thinks the black looks better ....what can ya do right?? In all honesty though, I can't necessarily disagree with her on that point alone, lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GpsFrontier View Post
The second is I don't know if you glued P.V.C. tubing and if not that is fine but if you did it would be imposable to clean it out.
I actually did not for this exact reason. Since all the tubing remains inside the tub, I didn't care about small leaks and I wanted to be able to take it apart if need be for what ever reason. The one exception is that I did glue the "T" connection coming from the pump to the "+" connection it's flush with. I did that mainly for support because the pice of pipe that joined those two pieces together was so small it seemed unstable.

As for the pump itself, I indeed did purchase this from one of the local hydroponics stores. The box printing indicates the pump is "ideal for ebb and flow or drip hydroponic systems", but does not give any information relative to aeroponics such as PSI or number of emitters supported. The pump isn't designed to be used in a "true aeroponic" type system where high pressure is needed. The only tech detail I can find for it simply lists head feet and volume which is 8 ft and 400gph respectively. I used to have a PSI guage I could screw onto a faucet to read pressure coming out of it...I could maybe see if I could find it again and do a test hookup to the pump to get a PSI reading. I'm wager it would be fairly low though.

The pump itself is made by Hydrofarm and it's the ActiveAqua AAPW400 model pump. Here is a direct link to the manufacturers web page for this particular pump: Hydrofarm - Active Aqua AAPW400 ActiveAqua Pump 400 GPH.

They list the pump for $26.95 but the guy at my hydro store only charged me a flat $20 for them.

Yes, I ran several tests to ensure a nice even spray across all the emitters and that there was a fair amount of pressure coming out. It's not a "hard" spray per say, but it's coming out of the sprayers pretty good. Certainly not enough pressure to actually turn the water into a fine mist, but I get a nice fan spray out of all of them. I don't doubt I could easily add a handfull of sprayers without any noticable drop in performance, but how far could I actually expand before seeing a drop?? I don't know to be honest. As a comparison my first system has a 185gph pump with 8 of the same emitters inside a much smaller tote and, though I get good enough coverage for the application, it's a fairly weak spray and I honestly feel the pump should be a bit larger (or that I should at the least reduce the number of sprayers). Though I could also say that the new 400gph pump I have in the larger system would be waaaay to much for the smaller one.

Last edited by txice; 12-03-2009 at 10:58 AM.
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Old 12-03-2009, 04:35 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Quote:
It's not a "hard" spray per say, but it's coming out of the sprayers pretty good. Certainly not enough pressure to actually turn the water into a fine mist, but I get a nice fan spray out of all of them. I don't doubt I could easily add a handfull of sprayers without any noticable drop in performance, but how far could I actually expand before seeing a drop?? I don't know to be honest. As a comparison my first system has a 185gph pump with 8 of the same emitters inside a much smaller tote and, though I get good enough coverage for the application, it's a fairly weak spray and I honestly feel the pump should be a bit larger (or that I should at the least reduce the number of sprayers). Though I could also say that the new 400gph pump I have in the larger system would be waaaay to much for the smaller one.
Thanks, that helps. One system I have planed will have somewhere between 24 and 48 emitters/misters. The other will probably have something like 15 per growing chamber and I am not sure how many growing chambers but I am thinking 4 right now. The spray should not really be a mist anyway so that I am not concerned with, but rather a good constant flow for root saturation. The emitters/misters I will get from a hydro store and will take care of getting the right droplet size. But it's good to know that a regular pump can put out enough presser to run a descent amount of emitters/misters.

The presser washer and presser regulator that I had in mind would run around $100 for the presser washer and $80 for the regulator, plus miscellaneous fittings and hoses. So I was figuring around $200 to $225 to get it working. Thanks for the link to the pump. I see they also have larger pumps up to 1000 gallons per hr. Though I wont be able to get these pumps for these prices because we don't have a hydroponics store in our town, I would need to order online and add the shipping cost to the price.

I recently bought a pump (picture attached) to run my third hydro system and it is rated at 300-500 gallons per hr and up to 8.7 feet. I think the feet height is probably the import part because the higher it can go the more back presser it can take. This pump is too powerful for this system because it kept filling faster than it would drain. It was already built so I couldn't just add a second overflow, so I put a "T" inline with the tube and just ran it strait back into the reservoir to cut down the flow to the system. But that got me thinking this pump might be able to run the emitters/misters, how many was the question. I just got this pump at Lowe's for $44. Even if I needed 2 of these to run the 48 and/or 60 emitters/misters for each of the two systems it would still be cheaper, and I wouldn't need to figure out how to make it work.

Even though I still like the presser washer idea there are many unknowns and would be expensive to buy everything just to learn it wont work. It will put out 1500 psi and that can run hundreds of emitters/misters with that kind of presser (regulated to the system needs of coarse). Though that brings up the other major issue and that is volume, how many gallons per hour it could put out, how many gallons are needed for that many emitters/misters. I forget what it said on the box but it was probably wasn't high, but then again it is designed for presser not volume. I would be able to fit a larger/wider hose to it, but the size of the original opening/water outlet would dictate the ultimate volume it can put out. The last issue is filtration. I would need to make sure it had a non restrictive filtration system that will keep small particles out, or I am not sure what might happen to it.

I will probably build a similar design to yours sometime in the future. I especially like the idea of the upside down lids, and the use of weather stripping for waterproofing.
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Old 12-04-2009, 02:18 AM
txice txice is offline
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Certainly sounds like an interesting concept. I'd enjoy seeing what you finally come up with.

As to any future builds you might do similar to mine, if you use the same tote I did (which is a Rubbermaid Roughneck Hi Top by the way), just keep in mind that, for what ever odd reason, the lids on the smaller versions don't fit in the tote upside down. Must just be a weird design thing but all the totes I played with at the store simply would not fit. No matter of pressing bending or forcing would get it to go in. On the 54 gal. version though....slides right in like butter. Weird. Oh...another note on the tote, at least here in my neck of the woods, Home Depot was the only place I found that carried them and for what ever reason you cannot order the 54 gal. version from Rubbermaids website.

Oh yeah and speaking of weather stripping. On my small cloner system, I ended up running a 2nd layer of stripping around the lid in hopes it would mash up against the first layer around the top of the tote enough to stop the leaks...and it seems to have worked. I've not seen a drop come out since the modification .
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Old 12-04-2009, 05:49 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Quote:
Certainly sounds like an interesting concept. I'd enjoy seeing what you finally come up with.
I don't know how long it will be before I get them built (cash you know). But I will do some drawings to give you some ideas of what I am planing. I am trying to get the cash to build enough systems so I grow enough produce to sell at the local farmers market. I want to start a hydroponics farm but I will need to start small. For my plans I need $1000-$2000 to get the first 6 systems running. I'm planing 11 different crops. That should be a good variety, and a good start.

Sounds like a lot of money for 6 systems, but not really. $100 just for the business license, $40 for the spot at the market, and I will be getting the 2.5 gallon jugs of General Hydroponic nutrient about $90 ea x3= $270 plus shipping. Also for that many systems plus what I am running now, I will get a pH pen instead of using the drops because it will be cost effective in the long run. That's about $500 and nothing even built yet. I will be on the lookout for those 54 gallon Rubbermaid Roughneck Hi Top storage containers.
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Old 12-04-2009, 10:09 AM
txice txice is offline
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I'm with you...for 6 systems,and all the "extras" aside, $1000-$2000 doesn't sound bad at all for 6 systems. Heck, I've seen single "professional" systems advertised online for a lot more than that.
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Old 12-04-2009, 11:15 AM
txice txice is offline
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Just a quick update to add a couple of pics showing some of my little guys in their new home.
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Old 12-06-2009, 09:03 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Quote:
Certainly sounds like an interesting concept. I'd enjoy seeing what you finally come up with.
Well I finally have gotten some drawings done on the two main areoponic systems I am planing. I will post them each with there own post in this thread so the images and explanations wont get mixed up, it should be easiest that way for me to.

This one I call the "A Frame Aeroponic" design. As always I got this idea from a picture of a setup I got online (image attached). What I cant tell from the picture I just work out. The system consists of a through with supports extending up from the sides and along the top for 2 flat panels to rest in. These flat panels just simply rest in the slots and have cut outs for the baskets that the plants will be in. These panels are easily removable because you just lift it out. You can just replace it with a solid panel so you can keep the system running while attending to whatever needs to be done.

I have just done a simple drawing of what I have in mind for the emitters/misters. Built much like your P.V.C. emitter/mister system, just on a larger scale. I didn't draw all the emitters/misters in the drawing because that's simple enough to understand as you have already done it (but hard to draw). Just drilling a small pilot hole where you want the emitter/mister to be and screwing it directly into the P.V.C.. This is the system that I expect to be using between 24 and 48 emitters/misters, a lot depends on how large the system will be and how much coverage they each get. I am guessing the system will be somewhere between 6 and 8 feet long, but the main panels need to be solid pieces or I may have problems.

You can see how the main panels sit in the insets at the lip of the trough, don't mind what looks like the P.V.C. tubing going through the wall of the trough, that is just a flaw in my drawing that I didn't want to redo. Also don't mind the way it looks that the P.V.C. tubing sticks too far out on the side view, that's another flaw because it's hard to draw it all to scale. But it should be able to give you an idea of how I plan to construct it. Though I may make changes as I go (as I always do). These insets should prevent water rising up and out of the system at the bottom of the maim panels, but simply drip back down into the trough making it leak proof. I may also use your idea of the weather stripping along the top and sides for added leak protection. Of coarse all the materials will need to be waterproof, so using wood will be out of the question. 100% silicone will be able to leek proof the corners and edges just like how they do on fish tanks.

I will need to post the other one later because of time.
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Last edited by GpsFrontier; 12-06-2009 at 09:41 PM.
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Old 12-07-2009, 01:01 AM
txice txice is offline
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Interesting design. So would you just rely on the angle of the panel to hold the pots in, or would there be some mechanism for keeping them in place?
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Old 12-07-2009, 02:29 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txice View Post
Interesting design. So would you just rely on the angle of the panel to hold the pots in, or would there be some mechanism for keeping them in place?
The angle along with the snug fit of the baskets, they should stay put fine. The baskets will need to fit snug to prevent leaking. The hard part will be getting the snug fit, I will probably need to get an adjustable hole saw to get the exact size hole I need. That along with the angle should be enough to prevent leaking at the baskets. But we'll see, something like a rubber band might be needed to get the snug fit I need. The angle needs to be good enough so the plants on the bottom will get enough light anyway and water only runs down hill. I will probably add some handles on the main panels also to make it easier to move around with the plants in it when needed. I may also glue a 1/2 or 3/4 inch sheet of Styrofoam to the inside, that will help with insulation as well as help provide a snug fit. It's easy to create the holes in the Styrofoam with a hand soldering iron, and also get the precise holes I need.
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Last edited by GpsFrontier; 12-07-2009 at 02:38 AM.
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Old 12-07-2009, 04:02 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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This system is what I call my Vertical Tube Aeroponic Design, I also got this idea from a picture I got online (pictures attached). I plan to use 8 or 10 inch tubing for the vertical part of this design. I can get this at the pluming supply house here in town. The side tubing will fit the baskets, and this I can get at the pluming supply house also. I haven't decided on the sizes yet and maybe might even have multiple sizes in one tube.

I also haven't decided the best way to go about creating the openings. I can cut the holes and insert the small tubes. This will also take some grinding down of the inside edge of the vertical tube to get the angle to point upward instead of straight in. I can cut the holes and glue the small tube to the outside of the big vertical tube. This will also take some grinding of the smaller tube to get the curve of the larger vertical tube and get the watertight fit. Also the inside part of the side tubes will be cut off if I go that way, it's just really hard to draw it that way. Also, the rows of side tubes for the plants will go all the way down to the bottom, its just hard to work with rounded surfaces with this program.

I left the top of the tube open and extended the P.V.C. for the nutrient delivery system (probably 1/2 or 3/4 inch tube) out of the top for you to see its positioning. It will have the same emitters/misters screwed directly into it. Both tubes will probably be about 6 feet tall, the nutrient delivery tube will have 3 emitters/misters (each in different directions), placed every foot starting one foot from the bottom (for a total of about 15 emitters/misters). The end cap at the bottom will have a larger piece of P.V.C. tubing glued to it that the tubing for the nutrient delivery system will sit in (to keep it centered). The bottom end cap will also have a through hole for the overflow back to the nutrient reservoir.

The top wont be a regular end cap. I will make one to fit and keep the tube centered. Probably round Styrofoam glued to a flat piece of something and simply fit it over the top. It will also be easy to take off without taking the tube out. If I ever have a problem with the misting system I can simply pull out the tube from the top and replace it with another one that is working, then fix the non functioning one later.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:05 AM
txice txice is offline
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Quote:
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I also haven't decided the best way to go about creating the openings. I can cut the holes and insert the small tubes. This will also take some grinding down of the inside edge of the vertical tube to get the angle to point upward instead of straight in...
Along these lines, have you perhaps thought about using a 45 degree elbow fitting? Maybe cut one side of the fitting such that it sits fairly flush with the main tube, and then you have the bend in the fitting that could give you the angle upward you're looking for. Might at least make it easier in the sense that you'd only need to make straight holes in the main tube and just have to tinker with the single fitting, rather than trying to modify both. Not sure that makes any sense. I can picture it in my head, just not sure if I'm explaining it very well.
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Old 12-07-2009, 06:11 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Quote:
Along these lines, have you perhaps thought about using a 45 degree elbow fitting? Maybe cut one side of the fitting such that it sits fairly flush with the main tube, and then you have the bend in the fitting that could give you the angle upward you're looking for.
I am not able to get 45 degree fittings without needing to order online. They only carry 90 degree fittings that I know of here in town, I could check the pluming supply house but they cater to the major pluming company's and I don't think they would really have a need for them. Maybe I am not understanding you correctly but I don't see how that would differ from using the straight tubing and just cutting the angle I need with a hack saw, it cuts in second's. Any angle fitting I would need to cut anyway because I don't want it to extend inside the tube. Also the cost of 2 or 3 inch fittings will be much higher than the tubing of the same size. The fittings are also a little bigger than that to allow the tubing to go inside.

For the straight tube that glues directly to the outside, I would first cut the length I need, then cut the angle I need on one side. To match the curved surface of the main tube I would use a sanding or grinding wheel of the same diameter (8 inch tube, 8 inch grinding wheel). That should match it exactly to the main tube and insure the P.V.C. glue gets a good seal. Going this route I would not need to alter the inside edge of the hole in the main tube at all because it wont be going inside but simply be glued to the outside. I also wouldn't need to worry about the exact hole size as long as the basket fits through the hole.This in the long run will probably be the easiest method.

Quote:
and then you have the bend in the fitting that could give you the angle upward you're looking for.
I think you mean more like push it in the right direction because P.V.C. does not bend unless heated just right.

For the strait tube that goes through the main tube I would cut the length I need, then cut the hole to just the right size with the adjustable hole saw. Then take a small grinding week attached to the cordless drill and quickly give the inside edge the angle I need (that would only be needed at the bottom). The hole on top will ultimately need to be cut oblong to allow the tube to actually angle upward,for this reason especially I think the other method would be easier. Simply because this part would need to be done freehand and doing it just right all the times needed would be very difficult, then I would need to fix the imperfections or start over.

This steep may seem redundant because of the angle of the inside edge, but the angling of the inside edge wont allow enough room to maneuver the tube upward enough. The angling of the inside edge would give the flat surface area for gluing to. Then once inside with the right angle I would mark a line on the straight tube and cut off the part that would have extended inside the main tube. If not the roots would not get the spray for watering. In the long run the other method would probably be the easiest.
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Old 12-07-2009, 06:41 PM
txice txice is offline
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Originally Posted by GpsFrontier View Post
Any angle fitting I would need to cut anyway because I don't want it to extend inside the tube.
This is probably the disconnect I was having. I was going under the impression that the smaller tube would fit "through" a cut made into the larger tube rather than it simply being glued or secured in some other fashion to the outside of the larger vertical tube.

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Originally Posted by GpsFrontier View Post
I would not need to alter the inside edge of the hole in the main tube at all because it wont be going inside but simply be glued to the outside.
Yep...indeed where the disconnect was. I see what you are talking about now.

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Originally Posted by GpsFrontier View Post
I think you mean more like push it in the right direction because P.V.C. does not bend unless heated just right.
No, what I actually meant was just the natural "bend" that would be in a 45 degree type fitting (i.e. the 45 degree angle itself).

Of course....had I read your description a little closer I'd have gotten a better understanding in the first place :P. I got side tracked by all the pretty pictures and kind of skipped over bits of the rest...hehe.

Last edited by txice; 12-07-2009 at 06:47 PM.
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Old 12-07-2009, 07:22 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Well, I was describing two different ways of doing it and one of them did consist of a tube that went directly through the main tube, so I might have confused you. That's the one I later described as being the method that would be more difficult. I hadn't tried either method yet but will probably just go with the one that glues to the outside because it's much simpler and easier to duplicate time and time again.
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what I actually meant was just the natural "bend" that would be in a 45 degree type fitting (i.e. the 45 degree angle itself).
Well the problem is the baskets wont be able to go around that corner and make it inside the main tube. The baskets need to be inside the main tube (half way anyway) so the roots and growing medium can get the full effect of the sprayed nutrients.

The program I used to create the images is a free 3D sketching program by Google called Google SketchUp, The PRO version is a paid version, but the bottom one is the free version and the one I use. Just in case you are interested in it.
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Old 12-07-2009, 07:36 PM
txice txice is offline
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Certainly seems like the "outside method" would be the easier of the two for sure. Especially if you had access to a spindle sander with the same diameter as the vertical tube...would make for an easy job of contouring the smaller tubes I'd think .

Last edited by txice; 12-07-2009 at 07:44 PM.
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Old 12-18-2009, 11:16 AM
txice txice is offline
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Well it's been about 2 weeks since I've moved the plants over into this system so I thought I'd provide a quick update. For the most part, everyone seems to be doing alright. Then again, I'm fairly new so what might look like decent progress to me might not to the more trained eye. Several of my pepper plants are starting to get little blooms starting on them. Thinking it's time to switch out my MH light and put in the HPS and move to a "bloom formula" for the nutrient solution.

One of my little thai sun plants (left pic, bottom most right plant) didn't take to the move very well for some reason (wondering if I maybe damaged the roots when putting in the hydroton or something). He's hanging on by a thread and it looks like some root development is starting. Hoping he will make a come back, but we'll see.
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Old 12-18-2009, 02:11 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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One of my little thai sun plants (left pic, bottom most right plant) didn't take to the move very well for some reason (wondering if I maybe damaged the roots when putting in the hydroton or something). He's hanging on by a thread and it looks like some root development is starting. Hoping he will make a come back, but we'll see.
That may be a possibility. I would also make sure it's getting sprayed with the nutrient solution adequately. It looks as if it's getting as much light as the plant that is to its left, and that plant seems to be doing fine.
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and move to a "bloom formula" for the nutrient solution.
Typically a bloom formula is designed for plants that are for the most part are dun growing and are at the fruiting stage of there life cycle, and in doing so all the fruit ripens at the same time. Pepper plants are different in that they are a continuously fruiting plant. That is they continue growing while fruiting. Because of this, the plant has fruit on it that is in all different stages of ripening. I am not familiar with the nutrients that you are using so I am not sure what the manufacture recommends for continuously fruiting plants, but I thought I would point out the difference. As for lighting, unfortunately pepper plants also need both spectrum's of light for the same reason to do best. I am sure they will continue to grow with either light, but would do best with both types of light. But I use natural light, so I don't have hands on experience with artificial lighting.
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Old 12-18-2009, 02:35 PM
txice txice is offline
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I would also make sure it's getting sprayed with the nutrient solution adequately.
Oh that is definitely not an issue...hehe. You pull that guys pot out while the pump is on and you will get quite the nice little shower. It's certainly not getting any less spray than it's brother in the next spot over.

Doh...forgot the nutrient bit. Right now I'm simply using the Technaflora nutrients and have been following their "recipie for success" (though I've cut back on the strength of their printed recipe as discussed in a different thread). Their literature that came with the nutrients doesn't specifically mention anything about continuously fruiting plants. For the bloom formula it simply mentions this:
"Once sufficient vegetative growth has been achieved, induce reproductive growth on a 12-hour light cycle.
Changing your reservoir once weekly, apply the FLOWERING formula each week throughout the flowering or
reproductive life of your plants."
You can actually see the sheet I'm referring to here: Recipe for Success. I've been following the vegetative formula up to this point.


Last edited by txice; 12-18-2009 at 02:42 PM.
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