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Nutrients for 3rd world countries


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Old 07-01-2011, 06:25 PM
Saeid Saeid is offline
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Default Nutrients for 3rd world countries

Hi everyone. New here. I need to figure out how to mix my own nutrients for a Hydroponic setups as I am planning on taking my new found knowledge and interest to 3rd world countries and teach them how to farm with this method.

Many of the place I will go to will not have access to bottled Nutrition solutions as we get in the West. And the cost would be prohibitive any way.

I'm basically looking for the Holly Grail of the Hydroponic Nutrition. A recipe that tells me which chemicals in which quantities to mix to have a good Nutrition mix for the Hydro gardens.

Any help, links, videos, etc, would be much appreciated.

Saeid

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  #2  
Old 07-02-2011, 05:55 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Hello Saeid,
The Holly Grail, well I'm not sure there really is a Holly Grail of hydroponic nutrients (per-say). Different plants have different nutrient requirements, so there isn't a one recipe fits all plants (like a one size fits all shirt). If your going to make your own, you'll probably want to make them specifically for the plants your growing, rather than just a general use nutrient/recipe. Also if you plan to make your own nutrients, be prepared to learn some chemistry. Even though I haven't ventured into making my own nutrients yet, many people do. I do have some things I can post that will hopefully help you.

Here is nutrient recipe for growing tomato's from the University of Arizona
Nutrition

Here is a free nutrient calculator
Nutrient Calculator

Although I haven't read them yet, here are a couple of books on my list to get
Hydroponic nutrients : easy ways to make your own : a cultural handbook (3rd ed., revised.) by M. Edward Muckle.

Publisher:
Princeton, B.C., Canada : Growers Press, Inc. c1993
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A beginners guide to nutrient solutions: a guide to understanding and maintaining a hydroponic nutrient solution. By Paul Fowler

Published by Highdro, 2000
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  #3  
Old 07-02-2011, 08:37 AM
Saeid Saeid is offline
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[QUOTE=GpsFrontier;7528]Hello Saeid,
The Holly Grail, well I'm not sure there really is a Holly Grail of hydroponic nutrients (per-say). Different plants have different nutrient requirements, so there isn't a one recipe fits all plants (like a one size fits all shirt). If your going to make your own, you'll probably want to make them specifically for the plants your growing, rather than just a general use nutrient/recipe. Also if you plan to make your own nutrients, be prepared to learn some chemistry. Even though I haven't ventured into making my own nutrients yet, many people do. I do have some things I can post that will hopefully help you.


Thanks for that.
I'm downloading the calulator right now.

Here's something I found that's pretty useful too. I don't think one needs to learn Chemistry to mix certain amount of a salt in water. But it certainly wouldn't hurt. Here it is:


Hydroponic nutrient recipes
N - P - K
To make 1.00 gallon(s) of VEGETATIVE NUTRIENT 9.5 - 5.67 - 11.3
Use 6.00 grams of Calcium NitrateCa(NO3)2
2.09 grams of Potassium Nitrate KNO3
0.46 grams of Sulfate of Potash K2SO4
1.39 grams of Monopotassium Phosphate KH2PO4
2.42 grams of Magnesium Sulfate MgSO4 * 7H2O
0.40 grams of 7% Fe Chelated Trace Elements See Trace Box
To make 1.00 gallon(s) of FRUITING NUTRIENT8.2 - 5.9 - 13.6
Use 8.00 grams of Calcium NitrateCa(NO3)2
2.80 grams of Potassium Nitrate KNO3
1.70 grams of Sulfate of Potash K2SO4
1.39 grams of Monopotassium Phosphate KH2PO4
2.40 grams of Magnesium Sulfate MgSO4 * 7H2O
0.40 grams of 7% Fe Chelated Trace Elements See Trace Box
To make 1.00 gallon(s) of FLOWERING NUTRIENT 5.5 - 7.97 - 18.4
Use 4.10 grams of Calcium NitrateCa(NO3)2
2.80 grams of Potassium Nitrate KNO3
0.46 grams of Sulfate of Potash K2SO4
1.39 grams of Monopotassium Phosphate KH2PO4
2.40 grams of Magnesium Sulfate MgSO4 * 7H2O
0.40 grams of 7% Fe Chelated Trace Elements See Trace Box
Chelated Trace Element Mix
Iron Fe 7.00%
Manganese Mn 2.00%
Zinc Zn 0.40%
CopperCu 0.10%
Boron B 1.30%
Molybdenum Mo 0.06%
Please follow these directions carefully:
Fill your empty reservoir 75% full with clean, hot water. Multiply the above gram weigths of each specific salt
by however many gallons your reservoir holds as these ratios are based upon making only one gallon of nutrient
solution. Dissolve each salt, one at a time - make sure each salt dissolves entirely before adding the next.
WARNING:
These elemental salts are extremely reactive in their native states - use eye protection when handling
them and avoid contact with skin. Follow the directions given to you by the supplier. Avoid using
inaccurate “kitchen” type scales - your crop is worth it.

Now, off to find all these Chemicals.
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Old 07-02-2011, 07:50 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Quote:
I don't think one needs to learn Chemistry to mix certain amount of a salt in water.
Well it isn't quite that simple. If you had the exact salts that are in the recipe, and never wanted to taylor it to your plants, like in the case of a nutrient deficiency or toxicity, then you probably wouldn't need to learn about the chemistry. But sooner or later you'll need to alter the recipe/s, and then you'll need to know how each change will affect all the other chemical salts in the recipe.

For instance if your plants need more potassium, you'll want to know how adding potassium nitrate affects the other elements in the recipe compared to using potassium sulphate, or potassium chloride. Or if your recipe calls for potassium chloride, and all you have access to is potassium sulphate, you'll want to know what affect that will have on the other elements so you don't wind up causing a deficiency or toxicity. Their not exactly interchangeable, well not without altering the other chemical salts anyway. Also if you are planing to use pH buffers in your nutrient solution recipe, that's another aspect of chemistry that's involved.

You'll eventually also need to know which elements bond to witch other elements, as well as why and how they do. Most liquid nutrient solutions come in separate parts for a reason, that's to keep the elements from bonding with each other. You'll also probably even find that you will need to alter the recipe to taylor it to your water supply. Because whatever elements/chemicals that are in your water supply will affect your nutrient solution (and plants). Also knowing how environmental conditions alter plant chemistry will be beneficial to knowing what, how, and why to alter your plants nutrient solution recipe.

P.S.
I'm no chemist, and haven't made my own nutrients, but these are just some of the issues I can think of off the top of my head where knowledge of chemistry will be beneficial. The nutrient calculator will be able to do some of that chemistry calculations for you with regard to chemical salt interactions, but diagnosing, and problem solving plant problems is completely up to the grower. Not saying you might be able to get by without knowledge of chemistry, especially in the beginning. Just saying that if you want to get good at making your own nutrients, knowledge of some chemistry is needed. And like most things, you'll eventually wind up learning it through necessity whether you wanted to or not.
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Last edited by GpsFrontier; 07-02-2011 at 07:59 PM.
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:35 PM
Rkfm Rkfm is offline
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If you want to go more organic, or are worried about maintaining a supply of all those chemicals, you can always use compost tea. This allows you to build the nutrient (compost pile) locally and sustainably. Sure, it won't be complete as a store bought nutrient, but there are lots of ways to fill in the gaps.

If you want a really a good book for hydroponics get, "Gardening Indoors with Soil and Hydroponics" by George van Patten. It's my bible. He has some great info on building compost tea and what materials compost into what nutrients. I.e sheep manure is a great overall nutrient (NPK) with lots of the micronutrients (zinc, iron). etc.
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:30 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
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Good point Rkfm, composting, and creating a compost tea is easy enough to do, even in poor third world country's. Even though it's not really a complete nutrient, it would be a great additive. If they get good at it they could even create different compost teas for specific mineral elements, and mix them in the nutrient solution like a commercial multi part nutrient solution.
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Old 07-18-2011, 11:00 AM
Saeid Saeid is offline
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Thanks very much for that. I will look for that book. that is great advice.

Saeid

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