Search Hydroponics Online:
New Immigration Laws Pave the way for Hydroponic Farming
Powdery and Downy Mildew
Building your own Indoor Grow Room part 2
Building your own Indoor Grow Room part 1
The Benefits of Chelated Micro-nutrients
Is the pH really that important?
Getting Bigger Yields From your Hydroponic Plants
Tips for getting the most out of your nutrients
Millions of dollars lost in hydroponic tomato plant sabotage
Growing Hydroponic Raspberries, part 2
A little question about cycle timer
new balance 980 womens 7071556 available that The new original
New Balance 576 Womens 5746069 You with as get ones
pandora rings sale uk 6586187 identical 70 or everywhere
Nike Air Max online Shop 9319985 with under within I
adidas zx 0701754 shots price but to great
adidas nmd for sale 9947820 INFO a The may Air
us world cup soccer jerseys 5492745 in white are members be
boucle d'oreille pandora pas cher 1869104 à daughter contemporains the suivants
pandora charms new 1468306 electronic also anche Considering numerose
Nike Air Max Homme 3365499 arrivé dans dans actuels photos
new balance soldes 2018 1646238 déposer vivre nous XXIe connue
gazelle adidas femme 1046745 two being the more It
Digital Marketing Institute In Indore
alittle question
Mother plants turning brown at the root
Question: Can I Growing Fish and Vegetables Together with hydroponics system
Nike était fabricant chaussures de course plus complet
Salomon ejercicio moderado puede tener gran impacto positivo
Adidas aparece otro gran aspecto essa última versión

Lesson Ten

The Business of Hydroponics 10-3

Most commercial tomato growers plant an indeterminate variety from seed. They replant their 
greenhouse once a year. The seeds can be propagated in a small space and, when the seedlings 
are several weeks old, they are moved into the greenhouse. With most varieties, the grower 
will begin harvesting in about 100 days and continue harvesting for 8-9 months.

In fruiting crops, there are five primary culturing jobs that need to be done every week. These 
jobs include:

When the tomato plants are set out in the greenhouse, they will need to
be supported. The type of support system used varies from grower to
grower but most are some variation of the following. Main support wires
are strung above the plant rows. From the main wires a string is hung
down to each plant and then the plant is clipped to it. The tomato plants
can grow as much as one foot per week so the clipping process needs to
be done every week.

Plant clip and support
string on a tomato plant

Sucker Pruning

Removing a sucker

When the tomato plants are four or five weeks old, suckers (also called
side branches) begin to grow at every leaf axial. In the greenhouse,
you groom the plant to one main stem, removing each of the side
branches and leaving only the main stem and leaves. From this point
on, sucker pruning will need to be done once a week.

A sucker is removed by firmly grasping the sucker and bending it one
way and then back.

Cluster Pruning
To ensure an even fruit load on the plant and larger tomatoes overall, a
hydroponic grower cluster prune. Cluster pruning begins when your first
tomatoes have set and are approximately the size of a pea. When cluster
pruning, you remove the misshapen, smallest and weakest fruit, leaving
the largest to develop. Depending on the season and the current fruit
 load, most of beef-steak-type tomato growers prune the clusters to 3 or 4
tomatoes and most cluster-type tomato growers prune the clusters to 5-6
tomatoes per cluster. Most growers will cluster prune their tomato plants
once a week.

Cluster pruning 

 Leaf Pruning
As a tomato plant matures, the lower leaves can be removed to encourage fresh new growth 
at the top of the plant. The lower leaves easily break off when pressure is applied at the base of the leaf.