Hydroponics Online Home Home Store Blog Forums FAQs Lesson Plans Pictures

Go Back   Hydroponics Forums Discussions > Hydroponics Discussion Forums > Hydroponics

Just wondered if anyone uses an air compressor for their air supply


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-26-2009, 10:16 PM
kbhale kbhale is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 10
Default Just wondered if anyone uses an air compressor for their air supply

Just wondered if anyone uses an air compressor for their air supply. I've seen a lot of good buys on 2 gallon models.

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-27-2009, 01:42 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lake Havasu AZ.
Posts: 1,855
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbhale View Post
Just wondered if anyone uses an air compressor for their air supply. I've seen a lot of good buys on 2 gallon models.
Unless you are running a large operation a air compressor will be a huge wast of money. First you can get an air pump at any pet supply shop, and at Walmart they run from $7 to $15. Second it would cost way more to run an air compressor than a air pump.

If you do want to use a compressor there are a few things you should consider. First, You need to filter the air to your system/s because even a dry compressor still needs a lubricant from time to time or it wears out fast. These contaminates would get trapped in the nutrient solution as well as the air stones contaminating your nutrient solution. Second you need to regulate the presser. Most compressors will have a presser regulator, but are designed for power tools and may not go low enough. You probably wouldn't want more than 5 to 10 psi Max or you risk blowing the lines and damaging the stones. Also if you have multiple systems you are using it for you may need multiple inline presser regulators, because the more stones and farther the distance form the source, the presser will drop rapidly.
__________________
Website Owner
Home Hydroponic Systems
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-27-2009, 02:06 AM
kbhale kbhale is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 10
Default

Thanks for the reply. I was just thinking, I have four dual pumps now. This coming spring I plan four beds outside another couple dual air pumps. I was thinking it might better in the long run to supply all air from one source.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-27-2009, 02:17 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lake Havasu AZ.
Posts: 1,855
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbhale View Post
Thanks for the reply. I was just thinking, I have four dual pumps now. This coming spring I plan four beds outside another couple dual air pumps. I was thinking it might better in the long run to supply all air from one source.
I have often thought that myself, I have 3 systems running right now and have more planed. I am also looking for another single source for the air supply, though I haven't been really looking. I would first find a place that sold really large fish tanks. Like 1000 gallons and up and ask what they use in those fish tanks for there air supply.
__________________
Website Owner
Home Hydroponic Systems
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-27-2009, 04:28 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lake Havasu AZ.
Posts: 1,855
Default

I Did a quick search for Large aquarium air pumps and found a few possibility's (especially the last one), but I would want to call them and talk to a live person to make sure that they will work for your purpose.

TETRA-TEC DEEP WATER AIR PUMPS
High-Pressure Aquarium Air pump 7.0 P.S.I.
Air Pump with Diffuser - 9150 cu. in. per Minute
Aquarium Linear Air Pumps
__________________
Website Owner
Home Hydroponic Systems

Last edited by GpsFrontier; 11-27-2009 at 06:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-29-2009, 03:23 PM
smurf smurf is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 52
Default

oil in the water? no way. Dont worry about that.

There are many many large air supply for fish pumps that feed 4+ air lines.
Remember air pumps only push out around 3 - 4 psi.



Now you can add a oil catch can to a air compressor and no oil or water will be returned to your water supply system. Think about it, they paint cars and such with air compressors and if oil got into paint it would look like crap.

It you think that you need a mass amount of air, I would recommend getting a high volume air pump for a fish tank not a air compressor. However if you needed to get a air comp. then get a large one, like 25 gallons and set the regulator to 2 psi - just like a fish pump. It wont turn on very much.

I have used the above fish pump to make an air lift system to filter a 6000 gallon fish tank. So I think a compressor is over kill.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-29-2009, 05:18 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lake Havasu AZ.
Posts: 1,855
Default

Quote:
Now you can add a oil catch can to a air compressor and no oil or water will be returned to your water supply system. Think about it, they paint cars and such with air compressors and if oil got into paint it would look like crap.
Ya I worked in the automotive field doing breaks and front end work for almost 5 years myself. Never in paint and body work. I know that there are filters that will get oil and water out. We used the water filters because they will rust the air tools, but we want the oil to lubricate them. I am not sure what they call the oil filters they use for paint and body but I am doubt there cheep. The one I used at home for filtering water was around $100 if I remember correctly.
Quote:
However if you needed to get a air comp. then get a large one, like 25 gallons and set the regulator to 2 psi - just like a fish pump. It wont turn on very much.
I want to get a 25 to 60 gallon compressor so I can get back into doing auto repair work for myself again. Compressors will vary in price especially locally, though I would expect to spend $300-$400 for a decent 25 gallon compressor. Ya the larger the tank, the less it will need to go on to build the presser up again. I haven't really looked at the regulators but I think a regulator that can be set that low will be a special order. I always had mine set at 90 psi for my air tools but not sure how low it would go. Because air tools are designed to run efficiently at 90-100 psi I don't think the regulators that come with the compressor would be designed to go much lower than 50 or 60 psi, that's why I think it would be a special order.

Also if you were using it for many systems you will probably run into a problem with the amount of volume it would put out. Just like with an air pump every time you add an air stone the line the pressure/volume drops. So if the output is 2 psi at the compressor, by the time you run it to all the multiple hydroponic systems you wanted to you will probably not have enough output to do much good. Unless you run multiple lines out of the compressor at say 50 psi then have a regulator at the end of those lines set at 2 psi. From there you could probably run 3 or 4 lines of 2 psi at that point that will have enough volume of air to do the job.

Then again with some trial and error as well as a regulator that has a wide range of low pressure output you could probably use a higher output at the compressor like maybe 5 or 6 psi, and by the time you run the lines to 15 or 20 air stones the pressure could be right at the stones. Though you would probably need to build a splitter so you can run all your lines from one place. Though I cant see it as being cost effective unless you were building a hydroponics farm for selling produce.
Quote:
I have used the above fish pump to make an air lift system to filter a 6000 gallon fish tank. So I think a compressor is over kill.
When I was looking for the large air pumps I read many times a reference to air lift systems for fish tanks, But I have no idea what that is and how exactly it's different from using air stones and/or which is better
__________________
Website Owner
Home Hydroponic Systems

Last edited by GpsFrontier; 12-29-2009 at 05:45 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-29-2009, 06:09 PM
smurf smurf is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 52
Default









See all the holes?
The small pipes on the left and right, pump air into the air chamber. The holes defuse the air, in the water line. Air rises right? as it bubbles to the top, it pushes water over the top of the tank.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-03-2010, 02:35 AM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lake Havasu AZ.
Posts: 1,855
Default

I can only read English so I cant read the words in the diagram. I Assume the water is suppose to fill the center tube and rise as it fills with air, at the same time it would need to have a continuous supply of water. I cant tell from the pictures or diagram but I would guess the center tube should extend down farther with holes in it to allow water to continue to fill it? I did however find a picture that gave me an idea (picture attached).

This seemed to illustrate the same principal but just on a much smaller scale. The air line goes in through the left side of the "T" connector and up the center. There is a second tube (the green one) in the center of the "T" connector that directs the water/air where to go. Lastly a continuous flow of water is supplied by the opening on the right side of the "T" connector. I did put one of these together and test it. It did allow the water to bubble over the top, not real strong but did flow over the top. I then tried to up the scale and used 1/2 inch P.V.C. tubing and "T" connector. I got a lot of bubbling but no water over the top.

I don't know if my conclusions are correct but I think that there are three major factors here. One is the smaller the air bubbles the better. The second one is the deeper it is in the water the better, allowing the air bubbles more force in rising to the top. Lastly I think the diameter of the tube the air rises up in lifting the water is directly affected by the amount of air being pumped. Wider tube and less air flow, probably less water flow. Smaller tube and the same air flow I think probably more water flow also. Mainly because there would be more force from the air rising in a smaller tube.

I don't know how much volume of water can be displaced nor how high above the water surface it would be able to go.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	air.jpg
Views:	470
Size:	16.4 KB
ID:	408  
__________________
Website Owner
Home Hydroponic Systems

Last edited by GpsFrontier; 01-03-2010 at 02:45 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-03-2010, 10:02 AM
Amigatec Amigatec is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 152
Default

That's how the a Waterfarm works. The air forces the water up the pipe.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	678.jpg
Views:	476
Size:	38.1 KB
ID:	409   Click image for larger version

Name:	677.jpg
Views:	465
Size:	52.3 KB
ID:	410   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3179.jpg
Views:	481
Size:	92.1 KB
ID:	411   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3181.jpg
Views:	508
Size:	85.9 KB
ID:	412   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3182.jpg
Views:	402
Size:	91.2 KB
ID:	413  

Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-03-2010, 06:28 PM
GpsFrontier GpsFrontier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lake Havasu AZ.
Posts: 1,855
Default

Quote:
That's how the a Waterfarm works. The air forces the water up the pipe.
Yes, but I am wondering if the same principal can be used on a much larger scale. Like to feed a flood and drain system or maybe a drip system that uses one reservoir instead of every plant needing its own reservoir. That will take a good amount of water flow as well as need to travel some distance before it reaches all the plants. If it were possible, it would aerate the water at the same time as it moves the water. Needing only pump instead of both a water and air pump, costing less to run. But it would all depend on the water flow, weather it would be economical.
__________________
Website Owner
Home Hydroponic Systems
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-03-2010, 06:38 PM
Amigatec Amigatec is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 152
Default

It would probably work, but I think you would need more air the higher you lift it.

A pump likw this might work good. 110 lph I use it to make compost tea for my giant pumpkin.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Tea-Brewer12.jpg
Views:	664
Size:	98.7 KB
ID:	430  
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-03-2010, 06:39 PM
Amigatec Amigatec is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 152
Default

I plan to buy another one just for the Hydroroom.

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.