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Tomato diagnosis


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  #1  
Old 07-29-2009, 07:40 AM
Soggy Soggy is offline
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Default Tomato diagnosis

Guys, is this the infamous tomato mosaic virus or just some bug infestation side-effect or a nute problem?




im using general hydro's dry mix and the results before the infestation was really good.

The plants are overrun with mostly mealy bugs which i really cant seem to control with organic means (pepper + onion + garlic juice spray, alcohol swab, oil + soap)

Also, I planted some of the same tomatoes nearby on the soil and they are doing better than my hydro grown ones in terms of bug resistance. Is it silicates thats making soil grown plants better resistant?

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Old 08-09-2009, 10:33 AM
Soggy Soggy is offline
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awww. 240+ views and no replies.

Lemme shift my question to the varieties that are resistant. Assuming it is the tomato mosaic virus, how will the resistant varieties fare? Will they be completely unaffected or the effects are less noticable and damaging?
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Old 08-09-2009, 11:27 PM
Luches Luches is offline
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Hi Soggy,

I do not suspect TMV but rather a nutrient deficiency or uptake problem.

The problem with deficiency diagnosis is that there may be multiple (even light) deficiencies that interact with each other. One has to compare symptoms on younger and older leaves, if there is intervenal chlorosis or only venal clorosis or a combination. Very detailed pictures (showing these aspects) are needed to be interpreted by the book, and to do a matching diagnosis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soggy View Post
im using general hydro's dry mix and the results before the infestation was really good.
Is it FLORAMATO DRY™ what you are using? Unfortunately they do not give any specification of this product, and I am used to analyse nutrient formulas with their actual PPM content in macro- and micro nutrient. That's how you can guess what may be lacking (in case).

Mostly, dry mixes lack calcium, because calcium nitrate is not compatible in dry- or liquid mono-mixes. If you have soft tap water with enough calcium this might not be a major problem. If on the other hand, you unluckily have got hard and nearly calcium-free water, a dry nutrient without Ca is not appropriate for Tomatoes. Enough Magnesium and Sulfur should also be part of any decent tomato formula.

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Originally Posted by Soggy View Post
The plants are overrun with mostly mealy bugs which i really cant seem to control with organic means (pepper + onion + garlic juice spray, alcohol swab, oil + soap)
You can simply (in combination with the spray) get rid of them by brushing them off with a soft 1 Inch painting brush, holding a paper sheet with the other hand to collect them. Get rid of them as they weaken your plants gradually and may be carrier of other pathogens as well!

Check the Ca content of your product, the Mg as well and even Iron content. The light colored leave-veins could also point to a lack of potassium. Some necrotic (black or dark brown) spots or leaves or stems may also come from a K (uptake) problem.

What about PH and nutrient temperatures, - and what about climate and actual air temperatures, sun exposure (partial scorch)?

Check this please: Action Mode, Deficiency & Toxicity of the 17 Essential nutrients

Last edited by Luches; 08-09-2009 at 11:58 PM.
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Old 09-01-2009, 10:40 AM
Soggy Soggy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luches View Post
Is it FLORAMATO DRY™ what you are using? Unfortunately they do not give any specification of this product, and I am used to analyse nutrient formulas with their actual PPM content in macro- and micro nutrient. That's how you can guess what may be lacking (in case).
No, its the two part dry nute called maxi grow and bloom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luches View Post
What about PH and nutrient temperatures, - and what about climate and actual air temperatures, sun exposure (partial scorch)?
Nute pH is about 6.5 but im using an aquarium pH kit so its about 6.5ish . Climate is tropical (im in the philippines) about 26-33C (79-91F)
Full sun exposure from 7am to about 2 pm which i think is quite well tolerated with very little wilting during really hot days.

I was convinced that it was a nute problem but the same symptoms are now happening to the soil grown ones. I have since destroyed the hydro grown ones and am still observing the soil grown tomatoes if the plant can still recover.

Im currently growing park's razzleberry and really hoping they wont meet the same fate.
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Old 09-29-2009, 02:48 AM
Luches Luches is offline
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I have recently had similar problems and issues with my tomato plants, - and I have the same climate as you have (Northern Thailand). Monsoon season was very hot this year due to lack of rainfalls and I suspect the high temperatures (too much sun exposure also) to be the major issue here. Especially too high night temperatures. My plants did actually recover during longer rain periods (lower temperatures), lately. I'd recommend a few hours (best is early morning) of direct sunlight only. Best would even be to limit main tomato culture during the coolest season (nov-feb) here, I guess. Or perhaps look out for more heat resistant cultivars. I have a tasty semi-wild variety (local) that copes pretty well with the heat.

Cheers,

Luches
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Old 11-04-2009, 09:38 AM
Soggy Soggy is offline
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Well, the razzleberry is really stunted, blossom drops and all. Its the same for soil and hydro grown ones. I guess its really the heat (which has been really intense even up to now).

Sigh, i guess ill have to look for heat tolerant varieties and be content with cardboard tasting grocery tomatoes
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  #7  
Old 11-04-2009, 11:12 AM
Luches Luches is offline
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Hi again Soggy,

I had to eliminate most of my tomato plants as well a couple of weeks ago.
Yes, the heat and perhaps some wilt brought by white flies. And I now also have spotted some white flies on your previous pics. Be careful with those, they are carrier of many nasty deceases! Watch leaves daily and take measures, quicker than a.s.a.p.

I've got a wild species (native from Northern Thailand) that is very resistant for heat and against all the nasty stuff as well.

If you are interested, write me a PM with your address and I'll send you some seeds over.

cheers Luches
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Old 11-14-2009, 12:21 AM
Soggy Soggy is offline
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I talked to a local seed retailer and the guy said that its most likely the tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) which has been a problem for non greenhouse growers here. and... incidentally, they have 2 varieties of TYLCV resistant tomatoes. hehehe.

oh well, might as well try them out too.
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  #9  
Old 11-14-2009, 01:48 AM
Luches Luches is offline
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To be sure if you deal with TYLCV, take some leaf samples (packed in a zip back) and contact the local pest control. Not sure how well organized it's in the Philippines though, - here in Thailand I am lucky to have got an office next door.

They can tell you A. if your plants truly are (have been) infected with TYLCV and B. if those as resistant claimed varieties really are "resistant", as told by the dealer or claimed by the manufacturer. In case you actually deal with TYLCV, it has most probably been brought in by carrier bugs (as explained earlier). Always closely watch you plants and check them for those spider mites and white flies, they may transmit other stuff as well!

Cheers and good luck,
Luches
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:35 PM
Soggy Soggy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luches View Post
To be sure if you deal with TYLCV, take some leaf samples (packed in a zip back) and contact the local pest control. Not sure how well organized it's in the Philippines though, - here in Thailand I am lucky to have got an office next door.

They can tell you A. if your plants truly are (have been) infected with TYLCV and B. if those as resistant claimed varieties really are "resistant", as told by the dealer or claimed by the manufacturer. In case you actually deal with TYLCV, it has most probably been brought in by carrier bugs (as explained earlier). Always closely watch you plants and check them for those spider mites and white flies, they may transmit other stuff as well!

Cheers and good luck,
Luches
unfortunately, we have no such facilities here. The only way to know is to try as many varieties as i can and stick to the one that does well.

I also remember planting zinnias a long time ago having similar problems. stunted growing tips and curling leaves.
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  #11  
Old 11-14-2009, 09:34 PM
Luches Luches is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soggy View Post
unfortunately, we have no such facilities here. The only way to know is to try as many varieties as i can and stick to the one that does well.

I also remember planting zinnias a long time ago having similar problems. stunted growing tips and curling leaves.
I understand perfectly well what you are talking about, having a tropical climate means that you have A+ growing conditions compared to some continental climate. But any sort of bugs and pests thrive and survive there even better. "If there are many rabbits to hunt, there will be many eagles and falcons as well, to compete with!

I also try to plant many species and varieties, to find out what resists and grows best. But what I also came to do, is understanding how to protect my crops against the greater threat. And the first thing to do is controlling carrier insects by spraying preventively some repellent (slightly poisonous) mix. Based on garlic, chili, black pepper, tobacco stems, neem and some fermented curare liana. Later is no real curare, but a light neurotoxin though. This measure prevents all sort of carrier and parasite insects from settling into cultures. These are to be avoided by all means, as they carry all the c**p. Be aware of ants as well, they tend to literary lodge blackfly cultures on- and under leaves of some plants! Green- and blacklies are also carrier of numerous plant deceases! Ants can be hindered to do this or chased away with diluted wood vinegar.

A very common measure in Thailand to control insects, is to have a so called "net-house". And remember also, "resistant" doesn't necessarily mean immunity... If some variety is supposed to be resistant, it will most probably only be resistant if in perfect shape. If already weakened by bugs and insects, - it may not be anymore.

Also, take the seasons in consideration - watch and take note during what season plants stay healthy or die, - which advantages and threats there are. What bugs are most active in what season, etc...

Good Luck,
Luches


Last edited by Luches; 11-14-2009 at 09:41 PM.
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